Isle of Albion
Photographed: Saturday 6th April 2013
Other Names: Uley Long Barrow
Site rating:

Hetty Pegler's Tump is a Neolithic chambered mound that dates back to around 3200BC. Often described as a long barrow, it is more accurately referred to as a gallery grave, due to the similarity in size between the entrance passage and the surrounding burial chambers.

The barrow is approximately 37 metres in length, and about 3 metres in height at its tallest point. It is situated overlooking the Severn Valley, although the view is obscured by trees.

The interior is accessed via a narrow forecourt and low entrance portal. Two large stones flank the opening, with a large capstone resting on top of them. This is placed low enough to force anyone venturing inside to do so on their hands and knees. Once inside, the inner passage is almost high enough to stand up in. The rear burial chamber can be seen directly ahead, and two side chambers are located to the left, on the south side of the monument. Two matching northern chambers are known to have existed, but these were damaged by workmen during the 19th Century and are inaccessible.

In recent years, structural damage to the dry stone walls led to the barrow being closed off while repair work and restoration was undertaken. This was completed in 2011, and the site is once again accessible and safe.

The barrow is allegedly named after Hester Pegler, who was married to the landowner in the 17th century. However this is disputed, since the barrow was only rediscovered and excavated in the 19th Century.

Hetty Pegler's Tump is a fantastic site. Located in picturesque countryside on the edge of the Cotswolds, this is a visually striking and highly atmospheric monument - and that's just from the outside. Access to the interior really takes this to another level, especially given the spaciousness and quality of the internal structure. The sympathetic restoration work has been done to a very high standard, making this a truly marvellous site to visit.